What We Actually Got With Repeal Of Net Neutrality

December 14, 2017

Today a repeal to Net Neutrality, specifically Title II of the Net Neutrality protections were voted on by the Federal Communications Commission (FCC). According to CNN, The repeal passed 3-2, along a party-line vote.

Many Americans were against the repealing of Net Neutrality on the basis that it would have negative effects thereby throttling, blocking content and they didn’t want paid prioritization. One among those who opposed the repeal was Congressman Mike Coffman who represents Colorado’s 6th Congressional District, he is now drafting a bill to stop the repeal, asking for this to be further debated in Congress.

The FCC never responded to the Congressman’s letter he sent as well as multiple calls from Congressmen for a delay. He doesn’t feel that the repeal should have been decided by unelected bureaucrats in Washington. I agree

There are several internet designers who actually designed and built the internet, they didn’t want the repeal either. Who better knows the internet than the guys that built it, right? I would trust their opinion over anyone else’s.

The pioneers of the internet all came together and sent the FCC a letter explaining to them that they basically did not understand how the internet worked.

Judicial Watch’s Tom Fitton is urging an appeal of the 2015 case regarding an Obama-era FCC decision which reclassified broadband Internet as a public utility so that it could impose its restrictive net neutrality rules (United States Telecom Association, et al. v. Federal Communications Commission and United States of America (No. 15-1063)). They have filed a Brief of Amici Curiae arguing Net Neutrality undermines the constitutional separation of powers by allowing the FCC to directly intervene in the broadband Internet economy.”

As reported by Gizmodo, early on in December the Commissioner of the FCC reported that her own agency was withholding evidence of fraud. Apparently there were literally thousands upon thousands of fake comments that were used to sway the vote. Comments from the public are suppose to be used under the Administrative Procedures Act whenever issuing a Notice of Proposed Rule Making.

Hopefully Congressmen Coffman’s bill as well as one filed by Senator Markey (D), Massachusetts will help to reverse this vote that was cast to repeal Net Neutrality.

If you care to help reverse the process and have Congress step in to save Net Neutrality you can go to action.aclu.org and sign the petition.

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